CUET English Chapter For Comprehension-Memories of Childhood

  • Board
    CBSE
  • Textbook
    NCERT
  • Class
    Class 12
  • Subject
    English
  • Chapter
    CUET English Chapter For Comprehension-Memories of Childhood
  • Chapter Name
    Memories of Childhood
  • Category
    CUET (Common University Entrance Test) UG

CUET English Practice Questions from Language Section IA Chapter-Memories of Childhood

Find MCQ Based questions for CUET English Language Section IA Chapter-Memories of Childhood. All the important questions from CUET English Clauses are covered with proper explanations of each and every question. 

This chapter will help you to build and solve questions based on Reading Comprehension

There will be three types of passages (maximum 300-500 words)

i. Factual

ii. Narrative

iii. Literary

Solving questions from the chapter Memories of Childhood will help you understand the chapter which strengthens your Reading Comprehension.

CUET English Practice Questions Chapter-Memories of Childhood Set-1

English - MCQ on Memories of childhood

Q.1. Who was ‘Zitkala Sa’?

Answer:

Zitkala Sa was the pen-name of Gertrude Simmons Bonnin. She was an American- Indian born in the late nineteenth century who suffered racial discrimination at t he hands of Christians.

Q.2. What does Zitkala-Sa remember about her ‘first day in the land of apples’?

Answer:

Zitkala recalls that it was a bitter cold day and there was snow on the ground. The trees were bare. There was a large bell that rang for breakfast and its loud metallic sound crashed through the belfry overhead and penetrated through their sensitive ears.

Q.3. Who was Bama?

Answer:

‘Bama was the pen-name of a Tamil Dalit woman from a Roman Catholic family. She published three main works, Kurukku, an autobiography, Sangati a novel and Kisumbukkaaran a collection of short stories. Kurukku is an account of the discrimination faced by Tamil Dalit women.

Q.4. What happened when Zitkala-Sa reached the hall for breakfast for the first time?

Answer:

Zitkala-Sa did not know how to conduct herself in the dining hall. As the bell was tapped, all the pupils pulled out their chairs and kept standing. Zitkala also pulled out her but sat on it. When, a second bell rang and all the students were seated, she had to crawl back to her chair. A man’s voice was heard and she noticed that all the pupils had bent their heads over their plates. The third bell was tapped and they picked up their forks and began eating. Zitkala felt extremely embarrassed and started crying.

Q.5. What does ‘eating by formula’ mean?

Answer:

The ringing of the large bell was an indication for all students to assemble in the dining room. Then as the second bell was tapped, they drew out chairs from under the table. As the second bell sounded loudly, they were all seated. As the second bell sounded loudly, they were all seated. A man’s voice and mutterings were heard at the end of the table. Everyone had to bend their heads over the plates. Then a third bell tapped. Everyone picked up the knives and forks and started eating.

Q.6. What was Zitkala’s first reaction to the missionary boarding school in the east?

Answer:

Zitkala-Sa saw a line of Indian girls wearing closely clinging dresses and stiff shoes. The crashing of the third bell and the noise of shoes and voices were like a harsh bedlam for her in which she was tied. The blanket had been taken off from her shoulders and bells were used as instructions for students.

Q.7. What warning was given by Judewin to Zitkala?

Answer:

Judewin, her friend, who knew a few words of English, told her that she had overheard the pale-faced woman talk about cutting their long, heavy hair. Her mother had told her that shingled hair were worn by cowards. This was a big blow to her.

Q.8. What efforts did Zitkala-Sa make to save her hair from being cut?

Answer:

As soon as Zitkala came to know about the decision of cutting her hair, she decided to struggle. Quietly, she crept up the stairs into a large empty room which was dim due to the dark green curtains. She moved to the farthest corner from the door and then crawled under a bed. She did not come out even when she heard Judewin calling her name. They found her and dragged her out. Although she resented by kicking and scratching wildly and shaking her head, they cut her long hair.

Q.9. What happened after Zitkala-Sa was tied to a chair?

Answer:

Zitkala-Sa was dragged out and she was carried down kicking and scratching and then tied to a chair. She cried a lot shaking her hair until she felt that the scissors had ‘gnawed’ off her thick braids. She then lost her spirit and moaned for her mother but nobody came to comfort her. From then on she experienced extreme indignities.

Q.10. Why do you think Zitkala was so opposed to cutting of her hair?

Answer:

Zitkala-Sa had been made to believe by her mother that only unskilled warriors, who had been captured, had their hair shingled by the enemy. Among their own native people, only mourners kept short hair and shingled hair was kept by cowards. She was therefore, dead against cutting of her hair as she didn’t belong to any of the categories.

Q.11. How was Zitkala-Sa treated on being traced from her hiding place?

Answer:

Zitkala had hidden under the bed. She was found, and dragged out. She tried to resist by kicking and scratching wildly. She was overpowered and carried downstairs. She was tied fast to a chair. She kept crying loudly and shaking her head continuously.

Q.12. What are the things that fascinated Bama as she passed the stalls in the market?

Answer:

Bama was fascinated by the dried fish stall near the statue of Gandhiji. The sweet shop and the fried snacks shops also attracted her. There were many shops and huntergupsy narikkuravan fascinated her too. He had his wild lemur in cages. He sold needles, clay, beads and instruments for cleaning out the ears.

Q.13. What sort of shows or entertainments attracted the passers-by?

Answer:

The passers-by were attracted by various political parties who had put up a stage and addresses people through their mikes. There might be a street play, a puppet show, or a ‘no magic, no miracle’ stunt performance. There were other happenings there also, from time to time.

Q.14. Bama watched keenly some of the actions of the people in the bazaar. What were the actions she observed?

Answer:

Bama would watch the waiter in coffee clubs cooling the coffee, with a lot of interest. He would lift the tumbler high and pour the coffee into another tumbler held in the other hand. She also observed how people would turn their eyes away to avoid irritation in their eyes, while chopping onions.

Q.15. What was the funniest episode that Bama watched one day while going back home?

Answer:

Bama saw an elderly man of her street walking with a small packet, holding it by its strings without touching it. When she saw him she felt like laughing aloud. He went straight to the landlord, bowed to him and extended the packet to him, cupping his hands that held the string with his other hand.

Q.16. Why was the elder of Bama’s street carrying the packet with its strings only?

Answer:

The elder held the packet from its strings without touching the packet. Bama’s brother explained that people believed that the landlord was of upper caste and the elder belonged to the lower caste. The lower caste people could not touch the packet as the material in it would become polluted. That is why he had to carry the packet by its strings.

Q.17. How did the elderly man approach the landlord and offer him the packet?

Answer:

The old man went straight up to the landlord. He bowed low and extended the packet towards him. He cupped the hand that held the string with his other hand. The landlord opened the packet and started eating the vadais.

Q.18. How did Bama feel when her brother told her about Untouchability?

Answer:

Bama felt sad and infuriated. She felt angry and wanted to touch those wretched ‘Vadais’ straightaway. It was disgusting to do the chores for those people who did not even consider them as humans. She wondered why the upper caste people thought so much of themselves only because they had collected money. Bama hated this discrimination and felt they should never run errands for these people.

Q.19. How did the landlord’s man behave with Annan?

Answer:

The landlord’s man, not recognizing Annan, asked him his name with a lot of respect. On getting the answer and realizing that he was from a lower caste and an untouchable, his manner of talking changed. He got to know about Annan as soon as he knew which street e lived in.

Q.20. What did Annan tell Bama to do? What was the impact of his words on Bama?

Answer:

Annan told Bama that being born in the low caste; they were stripped of all honour, dignity and respect. He added that education could gain them respect in society. He advised her ‘to study hard and learn’. If they studied and made progress, they would be able to throw away the indignities. His words had a profound impact on Bama. She was inspired to study hard and always stood first in her class and because of this, many people became her friends.

ESSAY TYPE QUESTIONS

Q.1. The two accounts that you read above are based on two distant cultures. What is the commonality of the theme found in both of them?

Answer:

Both of the accounts are based upon on the distant cultures and of two educated women from marginalized communities who look back on their childhood and reflect on their relationship with the mainstream culture. Gertrude Simmons was an extraordinary talented Native American who struggled and was successful at a time when severe prejudice prevailed towards the Native Americans and women. Bama is a Tamil Dalit woman from a Roman Catholic family. She was disgusted as the lower caste people were stripped of all honour, dignity and respect which she managed to regain through her education.

Both these women have pains inflicted upon them by their societies and cultures. They fought against this social and cultural discrimination and their efforts got recognition. Gertrude Simmons wrote under the pen-name of Zitkala-Sa and criticized dogma and oppression. Similarly, Bama is a pen-name and in her autobiography she recreates her childhood and its painful memories. Both these women have used writing as an effective means of battling discrimination and evils of oppression. Even the usage of pen-names is common to both these writers.

Q.2. Why did it take Bama half an hour and not ten minutes to reach home?

Answer:

When Bama was in class three, she walked home from school each day. She would loiter along, watching all the fun and games and the entertaining novelties that would attract her innocent eyes. She usually took thirty minutes as she would watch performing monkeys, the snake of the snake charmer or the cyclist to continue his performance of the past two or three days. The Maariyaata Temple with the huge bell hanging there and the Pongal offerings being cooked in front of the temple fascinated her. She would sometimes look at the dried fish stall by the statue of Gandhi and other stalls selling snacks, sweets, etc.

She paused to look with wonder at the stage put up by people of political parties. She would pause for a street play or puppet shop or a ‘no magic no miracle’ stunt performance. In fact there was always something attractive which caught her attention even if it were the coffee clubs and the way in which the waiters cooled the coffee or the people who cut onions. She even gazed in wonder at the people selling sweet and savoury snacks, payasam or iced lollies. Her account presents a child like joy in simple activities which is brought alive to the readers.

Q.1. The lesson ‘Memories of Childhood’ is

a) An autobiographical episode

b) A fable

c) A legend

d) A play

Answer:

a) An autobiographical episode

Q.2. The first account is by an

a) Irish woman

b) Indian woman

c) Australian woman

d) American woman

Answer:

d) American woman

Q.3. Zitkala-Sa was a victim of

a) Racial prejudice

b) Serious crime

c) Rape

d) A car accident

Answer:

a) Racial prejudice

Q.4. Zitkala-sa’s real name was

a) Pearl S. Buck

b) Tishani Doshi

c) Gertrude Simmons Bonnin

d) Hillary

Answer:

c) Gertrude Simmons Bonnin

Q.5. Bama was a

a) Bengali writer

b) A Tamil Dalit

c) An NRI

d) A politician

Answer:

b) A Tamil Dalit

Q.6. Zitkala’s experience started with her being

a) Handcuffed

b) Tied to a chair

c) Tied with chains to a bed post

d) Tied to a table

Answer:

b) Tied to a chair

Q.7. Zitkala was being constantly observed by a woman who had

a) A pale face

b) Fair complexion

c) Dark complexion

d) Angry look

Answer:

a) A pale face

Q.8. The line of girls in which the author was placed, wee marching into the

a) Study room

b) Playgrounds

c) Kitchen

d) Dining room

Answer:

d) Dining room

Q.9. The Indian girls wore

a) Clinging dresses

b) Nightgowns

c) Trousers

d) Skirts

Answer:

a) Clinging dresses

Q.10. The small girls wore

a) Shorts

b) Tunics

c) Frocks

d) Sleeved aprons

Answer:

d) Sleeved aprons

Q.11. As the bell rang, the whole group of pupils

a) Sat on the floor

b) Drew a chair from under the table

c) Sat on the stools

d) Knelt down on the ground

Answer:

b) Drew a chair from under the table

Q.12. As the author pulled out her chair

a) The other student snatched it

b) She slipped into it from one side

c) The others clapped

d) The other pupils made fun of her

Answer:

b) She slipped into it from one side

Q.13. Everyone kept standing except

a) The teacher

b) The matron

c) The caretaker

d) The author

Answer:

d) The author

Q.14. Everyone present in the dining room started eating when the bell rang

a) Once

b) Twice

c) Thrice

d) Four times

Answer:

c) Thrice

Q.15. While others ate, the author

a) Laughed

b) Watched them

c) Cried

d) Frowned

Answer:

c) Cried

Q.16. The author’s mother had taught her that the hair of the following people were shingled by the enemy

a) Skilled guns men

b) Labourers

c) Unskilled warriors

d) Generals of army

Answer:

c) Unskilled warriors

Q.17. Short hair, in the author’s tribe was worn only by

a) Mourners

b) Old people

c) Young kids

d) Elderly women

Answer:

a) Mourners

Q.18. Shingled hair was worn by

a) Cowards

b) Warriors

c) Young girls

d) Dancers

Answer:

a) Cowards

Q.19. ‘We have to submit, because they are b’. These words were said by

a) Zitkala-sa

b) Judewin

c) Marry-Ann

d) Christine

Answer:

b) Judewin

Q.20. The author, when she heard that her hair was to be cut hid

a) Under the bed

b) Behind the door

c) In the bathroom

d) In the attic

Answer:

a) Under the bed

Q.21. The author was being stared at by people and she felt she

a) Looked pretty

b) Looked terrible

c) Had suffered extreme indignities

d) Looked like a model

Answer:

c) Had suffered extreme indignities

Q.22. Bama’s incident took place when she was in

a) Class two

b) Class three

c) Class five

d) Class nine

Answer:

b) Class three

Q.23. The author Bama felt she already had experienced the humiliation due to

a) Dark skin

b) Short height

c) Poverty

d) Untouchability

Answer:

d) Untouchability

Q.24. The distance from school to her home usually took Bama

a) Ten minutes

b) Thirty minutes to an hour

c) Forty minutes

d) One hour

Answer:

b) Thirty minutes to an hour

Q.25. Bama used to dawdle along from school because she was

a) Too slow

b) Crippled

c) Distracted by lots of things on the way

d) Unable to wait for the school bus

Answer:

c) Distracted by lots of things on the way

CUET English Practice Questions Chapter-Memories of Childhood Set-2

Q.26. The author enlists numerous things that pulled her to

a) Eat on the roadside

b) A standstill

c) Take a side on the joy-riders

d) Watch the snake charmer only

Answer:

b) A standstill

Q.27. There would always be some kind of entertainment

a) In the school

b) In the church

c) In the bazaar

d) In the house

Answer:

c) In the bazaar

Q.28. Which tree had its fruit occasionally blown down by the wind?

a) Almond tree

b) Apple tree

c) Mango tree

d) Jamun tree

Answer:

a) Almond tree

Q.29. One day the author was attracted by the site of

a) Two riders on a horse

b) A monkey performing tricks

c) Cattle treading out the grain from straw

d) Dogs fighting with cats

Answer:

c) Cattle treading out the grain from straw

Q.30. The elderly man, Bama saw, was carrying a small packet and this made her

a) Want to cry

b) Dance

c) Want to sing

d) Want to shriek with laughter

Answer:

d) Want to shriek with laughter

Q.31. The man was carrying

a) Pakoras

b) Samosas

c) Jalebis

d) Vadai or green banana bhaji

Answer:

d) Vadai or green banana bhaji

Q.32. On reaching home, Bama narrated the incident to her

a) Elder sister

b) Cousin

c) Father

d) Elder brother

Answer:

d) Elder brother

Q.33. She had thought that the man carrying the bag was only

a) Making a game out of carrying the parcel

b) Trying to make her laugh

c) Obeying orders

d) Not touching it because it was hot

Answer:

a) Making a game out of carrying the parcel

Q.34. The author on learning about the practice of Untouchability was

a) Amused

b) Terribly sad

c) Happy

d) Very guilty

Answer:

b) Terribly sad

Q.35. Bama’s elder brother was studying at

a) School

b) College

c) University

d) Medical college

Answer:

c) University

Q.36. He used to get his books from

a) Neighbour’s house

b) From his teacher

c) From a library

d) From the city

Answer:

c) From a library

Q.37. Bama was very rebellious and the thought of oppression at the hands of upper castes

a) Infuriated her

b) Provoked her to slap someone

c) Made her abusive

d) Made her want to murder someone

Answer:

a) Infuriated her

Q.38. Bama’s brother was asked by the landlord’s men

a) His name and street

b) His address only

c) His parents’ names

d) His caste

Answer:

a) His name and street

Q.39. Bama’s brother told her that if she wanted to make progress, she had to

a) Learn to cook

b) Study

c) Learn to stitch and knit

d) Learn to drive

Answer:

b) Study

Q.40. Annan’s words for Bama had

a) Deep impression on her

b) No effect on her

c) Made her laugh

d) Made her cry

Answer:

a) Deep impression on her