CUET History Chapter 8 Peasants, Zamindars and the State Agrarian Society and the Mughal Empire

  • Board
    CBSE
  • Textbook
    NCERT
  • Class
    Class 12
  • Subject
    History
  • Chapter
    CUET History Chapter 8 Peasants, Zamindars and the State Agrarian Society and the Mughal Empire
  • Chapter Name
    Chapter 8 Peasants, Zamindars and the State Agrari
  • Category
    CUET (Common University Entrance Test) UG

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CUET History Questions Objective Types for Chapter 8 Peasants, Zamindars and the State Agrarian Society and the Mughal Empire Set-A

History - MCQ on Peasants, Zamindars and the State

Class XII

Q.1. In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries the how much percentage of population of India was rural?

a. 50%

b. 65%

c. 85% (True)

d. 72%

Answer:

Explanation: About 85% of the population of India lived in its villages.

Q.2. Mughal state derived most of its income from:

a. Agricultural production (True)

b. Revenue collection

c. Trade

d. All of these

Answer:

Explanation: Mughal state derived bulk of its income from agricultural production.

Q.3. The rural society was controlled by:

a. Revenue assessors

b. Collectors

c. Record keepers

d. All of the above (True)

Answer:

Explanation: Revenue assessors, collectors and record keepers control the rural society to ensure that cultivation took place and the state got its share of taxes from produce.

Q.4. The crops were grown for:

a. Sale

b. Trade

c. Markets

d. All of the above

Answer:

Explanation: Crops were grown for sale, trade, money and markets. It also leads to linking of agricultural areas with the towns.

Q.5. The basic unit of agricultural society was:

a. Village (True)

b. Block

c. Both 1 and 2

d. None of these

Answer:

Explanation: The basic unit of agricultural society was the village.

Q.6. The Indian rural area was composed of

a. Fertile Land

b. Dry and hilly regions

c. Forest areas

d. All of the above (True)

Answer:

Explanation: The rural India was characterized by fertile land, dry regions, hilly regions and forested areas.

Q.7. The major sources of agrarian history of sixteenth and seventeenth are:

a. Chronicles

b. Documents

c. Documents written by Peasants

d. Both 1 and 2 (True)

Explanation. The main sources include chronicles and documents from the Mughal court. The documents of peasants are not the source, as peasants did not write about themselves.

Q.8. Ain-i-Akbari was authored by:

a. Babur

b. Akbar

c. Abu’l Fazl (True)

d. None of these

Answer:

Explanation: Akbar’s historian Abu’l Fazl authored Ain-i-Akbari.

Q.9. Ain-i-Akbari was mainly used for:

a. Record the arrangements made by state to ensure cultivation

b. To enable the collection of revenue by the agencies of the state

c. To regulate the relationship between state Zamindaris.

d. All of the above (True)

Answer:

Explanation: Ain-i-Akbari recorded all the arrangements made by state to control the rural society.

Q.10. Which of the following source prove the agrarian relations in eastern India?

a. Extensive records of East India Company (True)

b. Records of Peasants

c. Records of Zamindar

d. All of the above

Answer:

Explanation: Extensive records of East India Company provide the descriptions of agrarian relations in eastern India.

Q.11. Detailed revenue records are available from:

a. Gujarat

b. Maharashtra

c. Rajasthan

d. All of the above (True)

Answer:

Explanation: Detailed revenue records of seventeenth and eighteenth centuries from Gujarat, Rajasthan and Maharashtra are available to supplement the account of Ain-i-Akbari,

Q.12. The sources related to agrarian history shows:

a. Conflicts between peasants, zamindar and the state

b. Peasants perception and expectations

c. Both 1 and 2 (True)

d. None of these

Answer:

Explanation: The sources and records gave an overview about the peasant’s perception and expectations from the state. Also they give evidences of conflicts between peasants, zamindar and the state.

Q.13. The term used by Indo-Persian sources used for peasants is:

a. Raiyat

b. Muzarian

c. Kisan

d. All of the above (true)

Answer:

Explanation: The Indo-Persian sources of the Mughal period used Raiyat or Muzarian to denote peasants. In addition, the terms Kisan or asami were used.

Q.14. According to the sources of seventeenth century the peasants were of:

a. Two types (True)

b. Three types

c. Four types

d. Five types

Answer:

Explanation: According to the sources the peasants are of two types-Khud-Kashta and Pahi-Kashta.

Q.15. The Khud-Kashta were:

a. the resident-cultivators (True)

b. the non-resident cultivators

c. Both 1 and 2

d. None of these

Answer:

Explanation: They were the peasants of the village in which they held their lands.

Q.16. The Pahi-Kashta were:

a. the resident-cultivators

b. the non-resident cultivators (True)

c. Both 1 and 2

d. None of these

Answer:

Explanation: These were the peasants belonged to some other village but cultivated lands elsewhere on a contractual basis.

Q.17. The peasants became Pahi-Kashta because:

a. they have no other choice

b. of compulsion

c. Both 1 and 2 (True)

d. None of these

Answer:

Explanation: The peasants became Pahi-Kashta out of choice because of terms either of revenue or out of compulsion because of economic disasters.

Q.18. In Gujarat peasants were considered wealthy if they were holding land more than:

a. 4 acre

b. 5 acre

c. 6 acre (True)

d. 7 acre

Answer:

Explanation: In Gujarat the peasants considered to be affluent or wealthy if they posses about 6 acre of land.

Q.19. In which of the state five-acre was the upper limit of an average peasant’s farm?

a. Punjab

b. Bengal (True)

c. Gujarat

d. Rajasthan

Answer:

Explanation: In Bengal, five-acre was the upper limit of an average peasant farm.

Q.20. Babur Nama was written by:

a. Babur (True)

b. Akbar

c. Abu’l Fazl

d. None of these

Answer:

Explanation: Babur was the first Mughal Emperor. He wrote Babur Nama.

Q.21. The factor/factor responsible of agricultural expansion in sixteenth and seventeenth century were:

a. Available labour

b. Abundance land

c. Mobility of peasants

d. All of the above (True)

Answer:

Explanation: These three factors are the major factors responsible for agricultural expansion in that period.

Q.22. The primary purpose of the agriculture was to:

a. feed the people

b. use it for market purpose

c. trade

d. All of the above

Answer:

Explanation: The basic purpose of agriculture was to fulfill the basic need of the people.

Q.23. The frequently cultivated crop/crops were:

a. Millet

b. Rice

c. Wheat

d. All of the above

Answer:

Explanation: Rice, Wheat and Millets were the main crops grown during sixteenth and seventeenth century to fulfill the basic demands of the people.

Q.24. Areas receiving 40 inches or more rainfall were the:

a. Wheat producing areas

b. Rice producing areas (True)

c. Millets producing areas

d. Cotton producing areas

Answer:

Explanation: These were the rice producing areas, as rice requires more amount of water for irrigation in comparison to the other crops.

Q.25. The backbone of Indian agriculture is:

a. Monsoons (True)

b. Artificial Irrigation System

c. Both 1 and 2

d. None of these

Answer:

Explanation: Still large percentage of rural population is dependent on the monsoonal rainfall for irrigation facilities in their agricultural fields.

Q.26. The plant of tobacco was first arrived in:

a. Northern India

b. Deccan region (True)

c. Southern region

d. All of them

Answer:

Explanation: Tobacco plant was first arrived in the Deccan and then later on spread to the northern India.

Q.27. Tobacco for the first time came across in:

a. 1601

b. 1607

c. 1604 (True)

d. 1603

Answer:

Explanation: Akbar and his nobles came across tobacco for the first time in 1604.

Q.28. Tobacco was banned by:

a. Akbar

b. Jahangir (True)

c. Babur

d. Humayun

Answer:

Explanation: Jahangir banned Tobacco because of its addiction. But in the end of seventeenth century this ban became ineffective as tobacco become a major item of consumption.

Q.29. Bahadur Shah II was deposed by British and exiled to Rangoon in :

a. 1853

b. 1858

c. 1854

d. 1857 (True)

Answer:

Explanation: Bahadur Shah II was the last Mughal emperor. He was deposed by the British and exiled to Rangoon the present day Yangon, Myanmar in 1857.

Q.30. Babur became the first Mughal emperor in:

a. 1536

b. 1526 (True)

c. 1516

d. 1546

Answer:

Explanation: Babur became the first Mughal emperor in 1526 after defeating Ibrahim Lodhi the Delhi Sultan in Panipat.

CUET History Questions Objective Types for Chapter 8 Peasants, Zamindars and the State Agrarian Society and the Mughal Empire Set-B

Q.31. The main limitation of Ain was/were:

a. Non-uniform data collection

b. Errors in totaling

c. Both 1 and 2

d. None of these

Answer:

Explanation: Historians have found some of the limitations in Ain. Besides the limitation, Ain is considering as an extraordinary document of its time.

Q.32. Ain was edited by:

a. Henry Blochmann (true)

b. H.S Jarrett

c. Both 1 and 2

d. None of these

Answer:

Explanation: Henry Blochmann edited Ain and Asiatic Society of Bengal published it in its Bibliotheca.

Q.33. Ain is made of how many books:

a. Two books

b. Three books

c. Six books

d. Five books (True)

Answer:

Explanation: Ain is made up of five books. The first three (Manzil-abadi, Sipah-abadi, and Mulk-abadi) deals with the administration. The fourth and fifth books deal with religious literacy and cultural tradition.

Q.34. The Sipah-abadi includes:

a. Notices and short biographical sketches of imperial officials (True)

b. Quantitative information on revenue rates

c. Detailed description of fiscal divisions

d. All of the above

Answer:

Explanation: Sipah-abadi is the second daftar or book of Ain that deals with covers the military and civil administration and the establishment of servants.

Q.35. “Account of the Twelve Provinces” has detailed information on:

a. Military and civil administration

b. Subas and their fiscal divisions (True)

c. Imperial households

d. All of the above

Answer:

Explanation: “Account of the Twelve Provinces” is a section in third book of Ain-Mulk-abadi and it deals with the geographic, topographic and economic profile of all subas and their administrative and fiscal divisions.

Q.36. The Akbar’s “auspicious sayings” were included in:

a. Third book of Ain

b. Fouth book of Ain

c. Fifth book of Ain

d. Both 2 and 3 (True)

Answer:

Explanation: The Akbar’s “auspicious sayings” were included in fourth and fifth books of Ain. They also deal with the religious, literacy and cultural traditions of India.

Q.37. The view of agrarian society in northern India is given in:

a. Manzil-abadi

b. Sipah-abadi

c. Mulk-abadi (True)

d. All of the above

Answer:

Explanation: Highly complex view of agrarian society in northern India is given in Mulk-abadi.

Q.38. Other than Mughal empire the other large territorial empire of Asia in sixteenth and seventeenth century includes:

a. Ming Empire

b. Safavid Empire

c. Ottoman Empire

d. All of them (True)

Answer:

Explanation: The Ming Empire of China, Safavid Empire of Iran and Ottoman Empire of Turkey were the three major empires of Asia during that period.

Q.39. The graphical account of the journey of silver across the globe and India was given by:

a. Henry Blochmann (true)

b. H.S Jarrett

c. Giovanni Careri (True)

d. None of these

Answer:

Explanation: He was an Italian traveller and passed through India in 1690.

Q.40. During the period of Akbar, the land left fallow for three or four years was known as:

a. Polaj

b. Parauti

c. Chachar (True)

d. Banjar

Answer:

Explanation: Chachar is the land left fallow for three or four years.

Q.41. Akbar has classified the land mainly in to:

a. 2 categories

b. 3 categories

c. 4 categories (True)

d. 5 categories

Answer:

Explanation: He has classified into four categories. Polaj is the land cultivated annually. Parauti is the land left uncultivated for reclamation. Chachar is land left fallow for three or four years. Finally, Banjar is the land uncultivated for five or more years.

Q.42. Amil-guzar was also known as:

a. Farmer

b. Peasant

c. Revenue collector (True)

d. Advisor

Answer:

Explanation: During the Mughal period, the revenue collector was known as the Amil-guzar.

Q.43. The powers enjoyed by Zamindars include:

a. Extensive personal lands

b. Fortresses

c. Control over military powers

d. All of them (True)

Answer:

Explanation: Zamindars had enjoyed the most elevated status in society and thus they enjoyed different powers given by the Mughal emperors.

Q.44. In relation to Bhils which of the statement is correct:

a. Spring was reserved for collecting forest produce

b. Summer was reserved for fishing

c. Monsoon for cultivation, autumn and winter for hunting

d. All of the above (True)

Answer:

Explanation: Bhils were the forest travellers and this was the sequence followed by them.

Q.45. Under Mughal period the crops considered as Jins-i-kamil were:

a. Cotton and sugarcane (True)

b. Wheat and Rice

c. Pulses and Millets

d. All of them

Answer:

Explanation: Jins-i-kamil means perfect crops. Cotton and sugarcane were considered perfect crops for revenue.

Q.46. Agriculture was organized into how many seasonal cycles:

a. Two (True)

b. Three

c. Four

d. None of these

Answer:

Explanation: The major seasonal cycles were Kharif and Rabi.

Q.47. The constituents of village community include:

a. Cultivators

b. Panchayat

c. Village headman

d. All of them (True)

Answer:

Explanation: There were three constituents of village community and they are- the cultivators, the panchayat and the village headman.

Q.48. “Mandal” was also known as:

a. Revenue collector

b. Village headman (True)

c. Rich Farmer

d. Peasant Explanation: “Mandal” were the village headmen. Most of them were very corrupt because of the powers provided to them thus they highly misused their powers against the peasants.

Q.49. The third battle of Panipat took place in:

a. 1761 (True)

b. 1760

c. 1762

d. 1763

Answer:

Explanation: The third battle of Panipat took place in 1761. Ahmad Shah Abdali defeats the Marathas in this battle.

Q.50. Nadir Shah invaded India in

a. 1736

b. 1741

c. 1739 (True)

d. 1733

Answer:

Explanation: He invaded India and sacks Delhi.

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CUET History Chapter 8 Peasants, Zamindars and the State Agrarian Society and the Mughal Empire
CUET History Chapter 8 Peasants, Zamindars and the State Agrarian Society and the Mughal Empire
CUET History Chapter 8 Peasants, Zamindars and the State Agrarian Society and the Mughal Empire
CUET History Chapter 8 Peasants, Zamindars and the State Agrarian Society and the Mughal Empire
CUET History Chapter 8 Peasants, Zamindars and the State Agrarian Society and the Mughal Empire
CUET History Chapter 8 Peasants, Zamindars and the State Agrarian Society and the Mughal Empire
CUET History Chapter 8 Peasants, Zamindars and the State Agrarian Society and the Mughal Empire
CUET History Chapter 8 Peasants, Zamindars and the State Agrarian Society and the Mughal Empire